BFF or NRF Friendship Truth #9

Over the past year, I’ve been sharing posts about the Friendship Truths from BFF or NRF (Not Really Friends)? A Girls Guide to Happy Friendships. These truths normalize everyday experiences and help preteens, teens, and adults navigate relationships. Here’s the final post in this series, Friendship Truth #9. Friendship Truth #9: You Choose Which ofContinue reading “BFF or NRF Friendship Truth #9”

BFF or NRF Friendship Truth #8

In BFF or NRF (Not Really Friends)? A Girls Guide to Happy Friendships, I share nine “friendship truths.” These truths help preteens and teens (and adults) navigate relationships with more social awareness. I’m diving into the Friendship Truths in this series of posts. Here are the posts about truths #1, #2,  #3, #4, #5, #6Continue reading “BFF or NRF Friendship Truth #8”

BFF or NRF Friendship Truth #5

In BFF or NRF (Not Really Friends)? A Girls Guide to Happy Friendships, I share nine “Friendship Truths.” These truths help kids (and adults) navigate relationships with more social awareness, whether it’s changing friendships, conflict, or mistakes. I’m diving into the nine Friendship Truths in this series of posts. Here are the posts about Friendship TruthsContinue reading “BFF or NRF Friendship Truth #5”

The Power of Our Words (and The Ugly Truth About Harsh Words)

Words have the power to help or hurt, build up or tear down, and perpetuate gossip or stop it. This article shares the ugly truth behind harsh words.

Guiding Kids through Friendship Problems – The Yoda Way

As parents, it’s hard to see our kids experience friendship problems. This article shares steps to help your child develop healthy relational skills.

Mean or Bullying Behavior? Helping Kids Understand the Difference

Do you and your kids understand the difference between mean and bullying behavior? Understanding the difference helps kids know how to navigate each situation.

How to Help Boys Manage Relational Aggression or Bullying

Mean girl behavior, or relational aggression isn’t just for girls. Boys experience these painful interactions and may not realize it’s a form of bullying.